Auditory, Autism, Television

There was an unexpected but positive mention of the Tomatis Method on the tough police drama “The Shield” . Vik Mackey, one of the lead characters, has an autistic son who makes notable improvements thanks to a teacher who uses the Tomatis method. Its a very brief scene and unfortunately the message that comes across is that listening to classical music offers a quick and easy solution to autism but it at least raises awareness of Tomatis method. Overall autism is handled very well in “The Shield” with the problems of bringing up an autistic child, especially the emotional difficulties for the parents, being a regular background story line for the show. I suspect that someone involved with the show has some first hand experience of the problems.

Worth noting that Michael Chiklis who plays Vik Mackey helps with funds raising and publicity for the Cure Autism Now Organisation.

Balance & Coordination, Current Affairs, Dore Achievement Centres

Private Eye magazine has a short piece in its ‘Street of Shame’ column about the Daily Telegraph‘s reporting on DDAT. As Private Eye doesn’t provide online access to its non-humor content I’ve reproduced in full below.

“SCHOOLCHILDREN suffering from dyslexia have seen dramatic improvements in their development thanks to a physical exercise programme designed to stimulate the brain… run by the Dore Achievement Centre in Kenilworth, called DDAT”, reported Nick Britten in the Daily Telegraph on 21 May.
“At the end of the study they were found to be free of dyslexia symptoms, no longer needed help in class, and could join mainstream lessons.”
Impressive. But perhaps Britten had himself had difficulty reading the words of the Telegraph’s education editor John Clare in his own paper just six days earlier, when Clare advised a parent to “waste no money on DDAT… Dore’s claim to have ‘found the answer to dyslexia and other learning difficulties’ is absurd.”

The two articles referred to are online: Nick Britten’s; John Clare’s. [Free registration required].

Given my history I disagree with John Clare’s advice and I encourage any parent of a dyslexic to investigate DDAT. It doesn’t work for everybody but for the many people it works for it profoundly changes their lives.

Balance & Coordination, Commercial Dyslexia Centres & Treatments, Dore Achievement Centres

With eight clinics in the UK the Dore Centres are probably the largest company focusing on treating dyslexia via cerebellum and vestibular development. Having been through their programme I can say its worked for me.

Coverage on Myomancy.com

January 17th 2006:Dore Achievement Centres on TV

January 16th 2006:The Problem With Adverts, Commercial Interests and Learning Difficulties

January 11th 2006:Dore Deceptive and Abusive Advertising

January 2nd 2006:Dore / DDAT Posturegraph

June 5th 2005: “It Changed Everything”

February 2nd 2005: Useful Background Article on DDAT

November 27th 2004 Wynford Dore on BBC Radio 5 Live (Download Available)

September 3rd 2004: The Dore Foundation

August 10th 2004: Retrospective Study

August 3rd 2004: Dore Centres on US National TV

July 11th 2004: DDAT Response to Study Criticism

July 8th 2004: DDAT Trial Critique Part 2

July 6th 2004: TV Complaints Upheld

July 6th 2004: Critical Appraisal of DDAT Controlled Trial

June 16th 2004: DDAT, Private Eye and the Daily Telegraph

May 21st 2004: DDAT Release Latest Results from School Study

ADD / ADHD, Books, Dyslexia, Dyspraxia, Food and Drink, Science

The LCP Solution: The Remarkable Nutritional Treatment For ADHD, Dyslexia and Dyspraxia

Dr Jacqueline Stordy, Malcolm Nicholl

To quote the back cover: “[This book] presents a major breakthrough in the treatment of … ADHD, dyslexia and dyspraxia”. And it does just that, presenting a clear case for the importance of Long Chain Polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPs) in brain development and the critical role they have with learning problems such as dyslexia.

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Balance & Coordination, Games, Television

Whilst research is still being done on the full effect of video games on a child’s brain, one thing for certain is that children are spending a lot more time sitting in front of the television and computers. As movement is a vital part of the brain’s development, the loss of time spent being active may have a significant impact on a child’s educational progress. It also tends to lead to over-weight and unfit children which has a serious impact on their long-term health. An arcade game called Dance Dance Revolution in which the player has to dance in time and in step with the game’s directions is being put forward as an aid to weight loss.
Recently I’ve been looking into similar games to see if they can be used to assist people with under-developed vestibular and cerebellum. Eye-Toy Groove is a Sony PlayStation 2 ConsolePlayStation game where you have to dance and wave your arms about in time with music. There is no doubting its a lot of fun (especially for drunk adults) and if you are looking for a fun, simple way to get you or child moving, this is it. Its clearly not a replacement for a properly designed vestibular / cerebellum development programme but it could help someone learn to move their body more freely. The downside to this game is that even at its easiest levels it may be too difficult for some people and without a lot of help and positive support it could have a negative impact on self-confidence.
See Also: Watching TV ‘is bad for children’;Children’s progress ‘hit by TV’.

Dyslexia, Science, Visual

The latest issue of Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience includes a paper on the difficulties of dyslexics have with visual motion and how this relates to problems with reading.
“Developmental dyslexia is associated with deficits in the processing of visual motion stimuli, and some evidence suggests that these motion processing deficits are related to various reading subskills deficits. …. Results suggest that there are in fact two distinct motion processing deficits in developmental dyslexia, rather than one as assumed by previous research, and that each of these deficits is associated with a different type of reading subskills deficit. A deficit in detecting coherent motion is selectively associated with low accuracy on reading subskills tests, and a deficit in discriminating velocities is selectively associated with slow performance on these same tests. In addition, … The two distinct patterns of motion processing and reading deficits demonstrated by this study may reflect separable underlying neurocognitive mechanisms of developmental dyslexia.”