Digital Fitness, Music

iPhone Plays Guitar

Do you have an iPhone? Would you like to learn to play guitar? Then PocketGuitar is for you! Its an iPhone homebrew application (meaning you need to hack your iPhone to make it run) that uses the iPhone multitouch screen as fret board so that you can practice your chords whilst away from your guitar.

Another wonderful way technology can help to train your brain.

26 Comments

  1. Tom

    Chris, as you are no longer working for Dore, have you considered removing the Dore lies, you are causing alot of expense and upset for parents and sufferers?

  2. myomancy

    Dear Tom,

    I suggest that you get out more and regain your sense of reality because you have clearly lost it at the moment.

    I have never worked for Dore nor have I ever received any money from Dore.

    Adverts for Dore occasionally appear on this site as part of the Google Adsense program. I have no control over which adverts appear. I receive a small (~$0.15) amount of money from Google each time someone clicks on an advert. Regardless of whether it is Dore or any other treatment program.

    As I have never worked for Dore I clearly cannot stop working for Dore.

    For you to think that I did work for Dore and now have stopped for some unknown reason demonstrates a failure of rational, logical thought.

    Please get out and spend more time with your family until you regain your sense of perspective.

    Chris

  3. tom

    Chris, thanks for the response, its just that you used to spend alot of time promoting dore in various forums and on this site and that has come to a stop?

  4. myomancy

    I never promoted Dore (at least in a commercial sense). I reported my experiences, which were very positive, and the research that show the Dore program (and similar) have a firm basis in science even if the program itself is not yet proven.

    I did this because it was, and still is, important that parents hear an independent voice. Dore does work, but not for everyone. Between the nay-sayers who dismiss Dore without looking at the evidence and the Dore publicity machine that promises miracles, parents need to hear a balanced explanation of treatment.

    Running Myomancy and posting on boards is very time consuming. Over the last twelve to eighteen months I simply haven’t been able to afford to put that much time into it.

    Chris

  5. Tom

    “..show the Dore program (and similar) have a firm basis in science even if the program itself is not yet proven..”

    Dont you think your falling directly into the pseudo-science trap there?

    You must consider that before a treatment should be considered effective it be be properly tested so (and I will, for a moment, assume that you did go through the Dore program, and you do consider it effective) dont you think it unwise that you are recomending it, causing the upset and expense for parents. Perhaps your experience was a coincidence.

  6. myomancy

    Thank you for assuming that I did go through the Dore program. After all, I’ve only stated it several hundred times. If you wish to call me a liar please be man enough to stand up and say so rather than making sly, ad hominem attacks on me.

    Of course my experience with Dore could be a coincidence. This is why proper randomised trials are need. However the idea that it was a coincidence is even stranger than the idea Dore worked.

    Why would a man in is mid-thirties suddenly stop being dyslexic? Is it:

    A: A year long treatment program that is based on 30 years of evidence showing a correlation between dyslexia and coordination problems.

    or

    B: It just happened.

    For you to argue that it was not Dore that treated my dyslexia you need to provide a rational explanation as to why I’m no longer dyslexic.

    Recommending it to patents based purely on my experience does carry some risk that parents will buy the treatment when it is unsuitable for their child. This is why I have done two things:

    1. I’ve repeatedly said that it worked for me but does not work for everyone.

    2. I’ve made as much science and information available to parents as possible so that they make an informed decisions.

    This is in stark contrast to dyslexia experts such as Professor Snowling who have attacked Dore without any reference to the science. Of course Prof Snowling has spent her life working on an alternative approach to Dyslexia so has a huge vested interest in Dore failing.

  7. Tom

    I did say that I will asume for a moment, to make my point. I have no way of verifying that you underwent the dore program, and well dealing with Dore I am not see no reason to take the truth for granted.

    “For you to argue that it was not Dore that treated my dyslexia you need to provide a rational explanation as to why I’m no longer dyslexic.”

    Still assuming, a simple answer would be the placebo. Are you aware of just how power an affect this can have, and how bizzare things can turn out if it is ignored. Homeopathy was available on the NHS until a few months ago due to the placebo affect. Other than the millions of pages wrtten about placebo affect, we dont need another reason to explain why these bizzare things appear to work, although this is always worth a read.

    http://quackwatch.com/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/altbelief.html

    “This is in stark contrast to dyslexia experts such as Professor Snowling who have attacked Dore without any reference to the science. Of course Prof Snowling has spent her life working on an alternative approach to Dyslexia so has a huge vested interest in Dore failing. ”

    Again, again and again, I hear Dore people use the conspiracy theory an an excuse for all the critisms. There really is no conspiracy theory. If Snowling or anyone else could be the FIRST single person outside of Dore to endorse this miracle cure, dont you think they would swap sides. Again, from the excellent quackwatch site, this is worth a read, although not specifically about Dore, the very same concepts apply

    http://www.quackwatch.com/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/Cancer/conspiracy.html

  8. Tom

    “2. I’ve made as much science and information available to parents as possible so that they make an informed decisions.”

    Yet you delete my post becuase I disagree with you?

  9. myomancy

    I did say that I will asume for a moment, to make my point. I have no way of verifying that you underwent the dore program, and well dealing with Dore I am not see no reason to take the truth for granted.

    For this to be a rational debate there has to be a level of trust.

    I have always operated Myomancy under my own name and likewise when I’ve posted on forums I’ve always done it as myself. With a few minutes work you could find my home address.

    You however you post behind a pseudonym and a fake email address. Yet for some reason you think I’m the one who might by hiding something. I have no problem with you wishing to remain anonymous but for this worthwhile debate to continue you must accept four things.

    1) I was dyslexic (or at least had severe educational problem) and that these [ http://www.myomancy.com/2005/10/16_years_on_my_ ] are one of three different assessments I’ve taken in my life.

    2) That I underwent Dore’s program for 12 months. Paid for by myself.

    3) That after undergoing the treatment I had a marked improvement in all areas related to my dyslexia to point that I consider myself cured.

    4) That I run Myomancy purely off my own back with no funding or influence from Dore.

    Without you accepting these points it is impossible to have any meaningful discussion. This would be a shame because subjects like the placebo effect and the scientific community’s response to Dore are important to making progress.

    Chris

    P.s. You may want to read this post which touches on the placebo effect [ http://www.myomancy.com/2006/07/the_cerebellum_ ] or use the search option to look for placebo. It crops up quite a lot.

    P.p.s. I believe in free speech and I’ve only ever deleted two comments. One was basically vandalism and the other was a libelous attack on a third party. If you don’t cross either of those lines anything you write here will stay on the site as long as Myomancy exists.

  10. Tom

    “For this to be a rational debate there has to be a level of trust.”

    This is about people being conned. Why should people assume what they are told is the truth?

    I see no reason why my being anonymous changes the validity of what I am saying. I am only relaying the facts. How genuine I am would only matter if I was the one making claims that are being disputed. However, I am certainly a genuine person, and would be happy to meet you. I will also be attedning a meeting at the Welsh Assembly about Dore, you may wish to attend this also. I can give you the details if you are interested.

    I am unable to view the images in the link you posted.

  11. myomancy

    “This is about people being conned. Why should people assume what they are told is the truth?

    I see no reason why my being anonymous changes the validity of what I am saying. I am only relaying the facts.”

    The reason your anonymity is an issue is that it reduces the trust in the discussion.

    You are claiming that people are being conned by Dore. This is a serious allegation but how serious it is depends on who you are.

    If you are a current employee of Dore with access to confidential information then your allegations carry a lot of weight. However if you were an employee of a competitor to Dore then your allegations would be seen as false and designed to discredit Dore for financial reasons.

    Who you are matters when you are throwing around serious allegations.

    As I said before, if you wish to remain anonymous feel free but this discussion will be meaningless unless you accept as true the four statements I made above. (I’ve fixed the links on [ http://www.myomancy.com/2005/10/16_years_on_my_ ], thanks for pointing them out).

    It may also be useful but not important to have some idea of your background. What is your interest in Dyslexia? There are plenty of debatable claims for dyslexia treatments, why pick on Dore? Have you tried any treatment programs, mainstream or alternative?

    Chris

    P.s. I plan a post on Placebo and Dyslexia because its a subject that needs more space than a comment here. It should be up today.

  12. Tom

    Sounds like wise advise, but I am not conducting business, only relaying the facts so I dont see how my phone number and address is relevant.

    This was also on that page …

    Be skeptical of ads that shout at you, like “MIRACLE CURE!!!”

  13. FrazzleDazzle

    Wow Tom, I’m not upset, nor did I waste any expense. I read the solid research of those like Levinson and Schmahmann, and read Chris’ testimonial and others like him. I read ones like yours too, but there was no info to back up what they said, so I dismissed them.

    And this has WHAT to do with the iphone????

    I think tom should be banned from your site, as Tom refuses to state any facts regarding exercise-based therapy to back up his opinion. I think it a shame for those looking for treatments to have to sift through pointless drivel to get actual useful information.

    I did find your site very helpful in making the decision to carry on with Dore for my son, and I THANK YOU from the very corners of my heart for the timeless hours you have spent gathering the most collective, unbiased site regarding treatments for learning issues.
    Thanks again Chris, best wishes!

  14. myomancy

    Tom,

    “Be skeptical of ads that shout at you, like “MIRACLE CURE!!!”””

    I absolutely agree with you. For Dore to call his book Miracle Cure was bad marketing. At a time when he is building more and more scientific evidence, to call it the treatment as a miracle was just stupid.

    Because I have nothing to hide, I will answer your question. I started my Dore treatment November 2002.

    Now, would you answer one of my questions. I don’t mind which.

    What is your interest in Dyslexia?

    There are plenty of debatable claims for dyslexia treatments, why pick on Dore?

    Have you tried any treatment programs, mainstream or alternative?

    Chris

  15. FrazzleDazzle

    Chris, if you look at his book as a statement regarding his daughter, and how the therapy literally saved Wynford’s daughter’s life, I think he has every right to call it a Miracle Cure. I’d feel the same way as a parent.

  16. myomancy

    FrazzleDazzle

    From a personal point of view I think he has every right to call it a miracle cure.

    But Dore has always been very sharp in his marketing and I think calling it a miracle is poor marketing because it gives ammunition to people like Tom.

  17. eraina

    As you all know, I am quite evangelical about the Dore programme, however, miracle cure is a bit far fetched….a miracle cure to me is a pill, that you take once, costs £1 or so… not a set of exercises that you do for a veeeeeeeeeeeeeery long time, everyday etc etc…….

    But…if I had to do it all over again..for the results Ive seen..I WOULD…well I WILL, when K is 7, when Dan is 7 and by that time Ill probably be just about able to put me on it too!! man… do I need it!!!

    Ill settle for a bottle of red tonight though!! xx

  18. FrazzleDazzle

    I guess the term “miracle” is an individual one, ‘eh? I totally understand Wynford’s enthusiasm for what the therapy did for Susie, and his heart to help other children, most who have no other options. I do agree though, that using that word for marketing is probably not the best idea. If you’ve ever met the man though, he really seems to have this everlasting amount of enthusiasm for the potential the program holds. He’s the boss, and he sees such positive changes in individuals pretty often; that’s got to be a great job, really!

    I wish him the best in his goals.

  19. FrazzleDazzle

    I’m already getting geared up for the possibility of grandkids having to do it too, seeing the genetic side of what my son’s issues are! (Just not tooooo soon!)

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